Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiled in Washington DC

The Frederick Douglass Statue in Emancipation Hall at the Capitol Visitors Center, at the U.S. Capitol, on June 19, 2013 in Washington, DC. Congressional leaders dedicated the statue during a ceremony on Wednesday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)
The Frederick Douglass Statue in Emancipation Hall at the Capitol Visitors Center, at the U.S. Capitol, on June 19, 2013 in Washington, DC. Congressional leaders dedicated the statue during a ceremony on Wednesday. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Vice President Joe Biden is hailing Frederick Douglass for his work to bring about equal justice, leading a series of tributes at the unveiling of a statue of the 19th-century orator and writer.

Biden, along with Democratic Sen. Harry Reid and Democratic Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, used the U.S. Capitol ceremony to call for equal voting rights for citizens of the District of Columbia — an issue dear to Douglass’ heart. Biden said the people of the District “made the right choice” in selecting Douglass as their representative.

The 7-foot bronze likeness of Douglass joins sculpted statues of fellow blacks Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr. and Sojourner Truth in Emancipation Hall. Douglass was born a slave in 1818 in Talbot County, Md. and advised President Abraham Lincoln.

Related Article: Frederick Douglass Statue To Be Moved To The U.S. Capitol

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press via thegrio.com

5 thoughts on “Frederick Douglass Statue Unveiled in Washington DC”

  1. We are all over, because we want to be wherever we can with our info. Some folks just like Twitter, some Facebook, some Tumblr — so there we are! And we’ve been talking internally about getting more user interaction, so you’ll see more of that in the near future. THanks again for always offering your comments, bernasvibe — you make us happy to be here!

  2. Long ago backintheday while in Jr High I did a report on Frederick Douglass..I got a much deserved A + and made my Daddy proud that I chose(as I did with any report /essay I had to pen..) on someone Black. Things like that mattered to my Dad; because he knew it wasn’t something I’d see alot in school books. Back then? There was NO internet either…I had to do all of my research from digging through city library books & encyclopedias…

      1. You’re more than welcome..Ooo I love the idea of asking for more feedback. Love it..I’m going to have to link up with GBN on all those spots. Y’all are all over the place lol.

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