“Hidden Figures” Inspires State Department Education Exchange Program for Women in STEM

(image via youtube.com)

by Hazel Cills via jezebel.com

After Fox 2000‘s space race drama “Hidden Figures” was released last year, an unprecedented amount of United States embassies were reportedly calling the State Department requesting the film. Eventually the movie was screened to nearly 80 locations overseas and because of all those screenings, a new, publicly funded exchange program will bring women from around the world working in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) to the United States.

The program, called #HiddenNoMore, will bring 50 women from 50 different countries who are working in STEM fields to the United States. The chosen participants will travel to Washington in October before traveling across the country for three weeks meeting with universities, Girl Scouts, and other organizations.

Then they’ll all come together in Los Angeles for a two-day event on the 21st Century Fox lot. Across STEM industries, women, particularly women of color, are vastly underrepresented. “Hidden Figures” already shed light on the important history of black women in mathematics, but with programs like #HiddenNoMore it’s cool that the movie can now help create its future.

To read full article, go to: Hidden Figures Has Inspired a State Department Education Exchange Program 

21st Century Fox and Pepsico Team Up to Offer STEM Scholarships with “Hidden Figures” Contest for Girls and Women

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Are you a real-life “hidden figure” on her way to changing the world? You could win a scholarship to help make your STEM dreams come true! PepsiCo and 21st Century Fox are partnering to find the next generation of girls and women who will lead the way in STEM. Sound like you? Enter the Search for Hidden Figures contest by Dec. 10!

Prizes are awards of $200,000 total in scholarships to 12 standout finalists. Winners will also receive exclusive opportunities and more from PepsiCo and Hidden Figures.

For more information and contest rules, go to https://searchforhiddenfigures.com

New Jersey Educator Naseed Gifted Launches STEM Comic Book, “P.B. Soldier”

Naseed Gifted (photo via blackenterprise.com)

article by Samara Lynn via blackenterprise.com

Nat Cummings is a talented computer hacker using his skills to pay his college tuition. A covert operative, he is well-versed in hacking, hand-to-hand combat, blade combat, and stealth.All is well with Nat until he is listed as a
n International Terror Threat,­ Code Red.

The newly formed government/paramilitary organization called The Establishment gives him a simple choice, either work with them to become a highly trained assassin or be terminated. Nat is the protagonist of a new science fiction comic book series, P.B. Soldier. The series not only promises an exciting story of an African American antihero, but it is designed to teach STEM skills.

P.B. Soldier is the brainchild of PBS Media, an independent comic book publisher founded by Naseed Gifted.

Gifted is not only the comic’s writer and creator he is a long-time math teacher, was an engineer, and is currently an administrator for the Pre-Academy division of the New Jersey Public Schools system.

Today, PBS Media is launching a Kickstarter campaign to raise $8,500 for the production of episode 3.0, the sixth installment of a 13 book arc. Funds will go toward payment to line artist and colorist Abel Garcia, and the actual production of the book, including printing and distribution.

A portion of proceeds will go to the Central High School Pre­Engineering Academy in Newark, New Jersey, where Gifted has taught and led for the past 13 years.

To read full article, go to: New Jersey Educator Launches STEM Comic Book

Cleveland teens win Robotics World Championship

A team of Cleveland teens just won the FIRST Robotics World Championship, in a championship competition that included 20,000 students from 42 countries. Youth Technology Academy Team 120: Cleveland’s Team, along with students from Illinois, California and Virginia, took the top prize on April 30.

“Everybody worked, had a part to do in the robot, it’s just teamwork,” said Peng Zhou.“Some nights we stayed until 10 or 11 o’clock,” said Mark Goeser. “Friday night consisted of this, we didn’t go to parties, we’re just here working on the robot, it’s a lot of work!”

The team, which consists of hundreds of students from the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, all of whom are looking forward to STEM and engineering careers.“This is where we aspire, it’s where we learn to innovate and become the future,” said Iris Harris.  “I feel like this is not only a big win for Cleveland but it’s also a big win for us and this helps our future!”

Source: Cleveland teens win Robotics World Championship

Dr. Alec Gallimore Named Dean of Engineering at the University of Michigan

Professor Alec Gallimore (photo via pathwaytoscience.org)

Professor Alec Gallimore (photo via pathwaytoscience.org)

article via jbhe.com

Alec Gallimore was named the Robert J. Vlasic Dean of Engineering at the University of Michigan, effective July 1. He is the Arthur F. Thurnau Professor and the Richard F. and Eleanor A. Towner Professor of Engineering. He also is serving as associate dean for academic affairs.

Professor Gallimore joined the faculty at the University of Michigan in 1992 as an assistant professor of aerospace engineering. He was promoted to full professor in 2004. Dr. Gallimore is the founder of the university’s Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory. Also, he is the director of the Michigan Space Grant Consortium, funded by NASA and the director of the Michigan/Air Force Center of Excellence in Electric Propulsion.

To read more, go to: https://www.jbhe.com/2016/02/alec-gallimore-named-dean-of-engineering-at-the-university-of-michigan/

Toyota Awards $75,000 Jesse L. Jackson Sr. Fellows Scholarships to Black Engineering and Business Students

Toyota Invests In Future Engineers and Business Leaders by Providing First-Ever $75,000 Jesse L. Jackson Sr. Fellows Scholarship, Summer Co-Op Internship Program and Mentorship Pairing (PRNewsFoto/Toyota)

Toyota Invests In Future Engineers and Business Leaders by Providing First-Ever $75,000 Jesse L. Jackson Sr. Fellows Scholarship, Summer Co-Op Internship Program and Mentorship Pairing (PRNewsFoto/Toyota)

Toyota is partnering with Rainbow PUSH Excel to provide $75,000 scholarships to 10 deserving engineering and business college students through the Jesse L. Jackson Sr. Fellows Scholarships. In addition to the scholarships, Toyota is offering these students the opportunity to work at one of their facilities across North America to gain valuable real-world experience, as well as be paired with mentors from Toyota management to help guide them through the next three years of college.

“The scholarship recipients were selected from hundreds of applicants,” Simon Nagata, chief administrative officer, Toyota North America, noted in a statement. “Toyota is proud to recognize and invest in the outstanding academic achievements of these 10 scholars. The commitment to community service and personal excellence of these future leaders is truly inspiring, and we are excited to be a part of their journey.”

With STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) professional jobs going unfilled, Toyota is preparing to fill the pipeline with qualified candidates. The scholarships were awarded to college students who are majoring in either STEM or business academics, states Toyota.

Students also had to demonstrate participation in community service and a financial need. The $25,000 scholarship is renewable each year for a maximum three-year period. In order to receive the award each year, the students must maintain a minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 throughout the school year.

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OPINION: Coding Is The New Black: Here’s Why You Should Care About Science, Tech, Engineering & Math

Woman on computer

It is no secret that many African-American women are not deemed to be very well-represented, or at the forefront in terms of publicity, when it comes to STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) related jobs and advancements. Due to this “finding,” many companies in these industries, such as Google and Non-Profits such as MotherCoders have started programs and initiatives to aid women and minorities in the pursuit to learn coding.

I will admit, I am am not technologically savvy. The only thing I know about computers, technology, apps and coding, is that if I have a question about anything remotely pertaining to the previously mentioned, I ask Arisha Smith, Vice President of Marketing at Pigeonly, a tech startup in the downtown Las Vegas tech hub that got its start through the Silicon Valley-based NewMe Accelerator program.

As many business owners have leaned on the internet, apps and other new found technologies to build, increase and further their businesses, I still reach out to Arisha to gain an understanding of how technology can help not only my practice, but also the business ventures of my clients.

When I asked Arisha to explain the importance of women garnering an interest in technology and ultimately learning coding, she offered the following:

“Knowing how to code trains your mind to think logically and process bite sized tasks in order to achieve a larger end goal. Understanding the backbone of technology, which is programming, accelerates a woman’s path to leadership in organizations, especially in forward-thinking companies.”

She further states, “You’re able to get right to the point when directing or managing projects with cross functional teams because you eliminate the need for the tech guys to feel the need to ‘break down concepts’ for you. It also allows you the ability to call folks out on their BS and keep projects afloat.”

If you, or any young woman you know, are interested in learning how to code, click here for several programs that may assist you.

article by Rashida Maples, Esq. via hellobeautiful.com