Tag: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Los Angeles Neurosurgeon Dr. Lindsey Ross Accepted into Prestigious White House Fellows Program

Lindsay Moss (photo courtesy Cedars-Sinai)
Dr. Lindsey Ross (photo courtesy Cedars-Sinai)

article by Lori Lakin Hutcherson (@lakinhutcherson)

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center resident neurosurgeon Lindsey Ross, MD, a member of Cedars’ Neurological Surgery Residency Program, has won a coveted position as a 2016-2017 White House Fellow.

Ross will spend the next year in Washington DC working in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and participating in roundtable discussions with top government leaders, including President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden.

“I feel so grateful for this opportunity. I know I will learn a great deal about healthcare, leadership and policymaking next year, which I hope to bring back to Cedars-Sinai and the greater Los Angeles community that we serve,” Ross said.

The White House Fellows Program was founded in 1964 by President Lyndon B. Johnson to offer extraordinary leaders firsthand experience working at the highest levels of the federal government. Graduates include former Secretary of State Colin Powell, historian Doris Kearns Goodwin and CNN medical correspondent and neurosurgeon Sanjay Gupta.

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Respected Surgeon General Regina Benjamin to Step Down After 4 Years

Surgeon General Regina Benjamin attends The Heart Truth 2013 Fashion at Hammerstein Ballroom on February 6, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Jennifer Graylock/Getty Images for The Heart Truth)
Surgeon General Regina Benjamin attends The Heart Truth 2013 Fashion at Hammerstein Ballroom on February 6, 2013 in New York City. (Photo by Jennifer Graylock/Getty Images for The Heart Truth)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Surgeon General Regina Benjamin says she plans to step down next month after four years as “America’s doctor.”

In an email to staff Wednesday, Benjamin said she will remain involved in public health. As surgeon general, she promoted disease prevention, smoking cessation and healthy lifestyles, particularly among minorities. Benjamin oversaw a report that documented how smoking, even an occasional cigarette or secondhand smoke, can cause immediate damage to the human body.

A native of Alabama, Benjamin is widely respected for founding a rural health clinic in that state, which she kept going although it was wiped out three times by fire and hurricanes. She plans to volunteer seeing patients at the clinic. Health and Human Services spokeswoman Dori Salcido said the administration is grateful for Benjamin’s service.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press via thegrio.com

Nearly 55 Percent of Black Women Breαstfeed, Up from 35 Percent in the 70s

African American women are encouraged to breast feed.
Photography by NHophotos.com

There are a wealth of benefits that are associated with breαstfeeding. In addition to bonding with the baby and providing it nutritional health, you quickly lose that “baby fat” acquired from pregnancy. Although African-American women breαstfeed less than any other race, the percentage of African-American women breαstfeeding today is nearly 55 percent, in comparison to just 35 percent in the 70s.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) launched “It’s Only Natural” this week, which is a new national public education campaign aiming to provide more backup and boost awareness among African-American women of breαstfeeding’s importance and associated benefits. HHS will provide the women with tips, practical information, emotional support from peers and education on breαstfeeding’s’ benefits and how it fits into daily life. The information is relayed in video testimonials, myth-busting education, radio spots, fact sheets and more. High-risk neonatal registered nurse and lactation specialist Cheryl Lloyd at the University of Mississippi Medical Center’s (UMC) Weiser Hospital for Women and Infants says understanding the process does not happen overnight. “It takes a little bit of time. It’s a process,” Lloyd said. “Breαstfeeding doesn’t always just happen overnight,” with habits to learn, growth spurt changes and other things expected down the line.

A cultural background in breastfeeding is a key ingredient for comfort in new moms, Lloyd noted. Not all new moms come armed with that; some even face family barriers to breαstfeeding. “You’re not just giving the infant a good start. You are giving this baby benefits for a lifetime,” said Lloyd, who is also president of the Mississippi Breαstfeeding Coalition. It’s not a guarantee, but research shows in comparison with formula-fed babies, breαstfed babies have fewer doctor visits, hospitalizations, less upper respiratory problems and more, she added.

article by Maria Lloyd via naturallymoi.com