Tag: Temple University

Three African Americans Among the Top 10 Most Influential Scholars in Education

Education Week recently published the Rick Hess Straight Up Edu-Scholar Public Influence Rankings. The rankings list the 200 university-based education scholars who had the biggest influence on the nation’s education discourse last year. The scholars are ranked in eight categories including Google Scholar ratings, mentions in major newspapers, books published and their rankings on Amazon.com, Twitter scores, and mentions in the Congressional Record. The rankings are calculated by scholars at the American Enterprise Institute.

Three of the top 10 influential educators are African Americans, including the highest ranked education scholar in the nation.

darling_lindaLeading the list of the most influential education scholars is Linda Darling-Hammond is the Charles E. Ducommun Professor of Education Emerita at Stanford University where she is faculty director of the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education. She is a former president of the American Educational Research Association. Her most recent books are Getting Teacher Evaluation Right: What Really Matters for Effectiveness and Improvement (Teachers College Press, 2013) and Beyond the Bubble Test: How Performance Assessments Support 21st Century Learning (Jossey-Bass, 2014). Dr. Darling Hammond is a magna cum laude graduate of Yale University and hold a doctorate in urban education from Temple University in Philadelphia.

gjladsonGloria Ladson-Billings ranked fifth among most influential scholars in education. She holds the Kellner Family Chair in Urban Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Professor Ladson-Billings is a past president of the American Educational Research Association. She is a graduate of Morgan State University in Baltimore and holds a master’s degree from the University of Washington and a doctorate from Stanford University. Dr. Ladson-Billings is the author of Beyond the Big House: African American Educators on Teacher Education (Teachers College Press, 2005) and The Dreamkeepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children (Jossey-Bass, 2005).

claude-steele-thumbClaude Steele is executive vice chancellor and provost at the University of California at Berkeley. From 2011 to 2014, he was dean of the Graduate School of Education at Stanford University. Professor Steele served for two years as provost at Columbia University in New York City after being a member of the Stanford faculty from 1991 to 2009. Professor Steele is perhaps best know for his work on the underperformance of minority students due to stereotype threat. Professor Steele is the author of Whistling Vivaldi: How Stereotypes Affect Us and What We Can Do (W.W. Norton, 2010). Professor Steele is a graduate of Hiram College in Ohio and earned a Ph.D. at Ohio State University.

article via jbhe.com

Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse Comes with its Own Hero: Barrier-Breaking Owner Ariell R. Johnson

Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse owner Ariell R. Johnson (photo via Ariell R. Johnson)
Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse owner Ariell R. Johnson (photo via Ariell R. Johnson)

The next time you find yourself in Philadelphia and in need of a comic books and coffee fix, there’s a destination in town that has you covered.  Amalgam Comics and Coffeehouse is owned by Ariell R. Johnson, the first Black woman to open a comic book store on the East Coast.

Johnson, a Baltimore native, says she got the idea for Amalgam over 12 years ago when she was a student at Temple University. A comic books fan herself, her favorite store sat across from her coffee shop of choice. She would buy copies of comics then head across the street to have a cup of joe while reading her new finds. When the coffeehouse closed, Johnson’s wheels began turning and she began planting the early seeds for Amalgam.

Amalgam Comics and CoffeehouseAmalgam rests in Philly’s up-and-coming Kensington section, and she hopes that it becomes a haven for longtime comics fans and newbies alike. There is also a push for diversity, as there are comic book lines that focus on underrepresented groups such as people of color and the LBGTQ community.

Another focus of the store is to feature not only the major lines from top companies like Marvel and DC, but also the growing number of independent comic book lines from across the nation. Johnson envisions Amalgam as a place where everyone feels welcomed and has put in place a staff that will help guide the less experienced on their comic journey.

There has been some debate whether or not Johnson is the first Black female comic store owner ever, but nonetheless she is definitely a rarity in the white and male-dominated world of comics.

article by D.L. Chandler via blackamericaweb.com

Historian Peniel E. Joseph Honored by Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for his Biography of Stokely Carmichael

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Professor Peniel E. Joseph (photo via citylights.com)

Peniel E. Joseph, professor of history at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, received the National Book Award from the Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change at the University of Memphis. The award honors the author of a book that best advances “the understanding of American civil rights movement and its legacy.”

P25898101._UY200_rofessor Joseph is being honored for his book Stokely: A Life (Basic Civitas, 2014), a biography of Stokely Carmichael, later known as Kwame Toure. Carmichael was chair of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He spent the later years of his life in Africa.

Professor Joseph has taught at Tufts University since 2009. He is a graduate of Stony Brook University of the State University of New York System, where he double majored in Africana studies and European history. He holds a Ph.D. in American history from Temple University in Philadelphia.

article via jbhe.com

“You Are So Beautiful!”: Adoptive Mom Lauren Casper Bonds with Daughter Arsema, 3, Over Hair Care

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Three-year-old Arsema watches a movie during the weekly mother-daughter hairstyle sessions. (Photo: Lauren Casper)

For mom and blogger Lauren Casper, doing her daughter’s hair is something she thought about even before she brought her baby home. Arsema, now 3, was four months old when Casper and her husband adopted her from Ethiopia. “Prior to her coming home, I had researched as much as I could about black culture and raising black children,” Casper, who is white, tells Yahoo Parenting. “For raising a girl specifically, I was learning how important black hair is in the culture. And while I was well-versed in my own hair, that is obviously very different.”

In an essay posted on Today’s community blog this week, Casper writes about watching YouTube videos and scoping out Pinterest boards to learn to style her daughter’s hair, and the mother-daughter bonding time that has resulted. “As the white mother of a beautiful black daughter, hair care has been a steep learning curve for me,” she writes.

“I want my daughter to love her hair and be proud of the springy black curls that cover her head. I want to be able to care for and style her hair in a way shows I understand that her hair is different and I celebrate her unique beauty.”

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Lauren Casper lets her daughter Arsema, 3, pick out a new hairstyle each week. (Photo: Lauren Casper)

Every Saturday evening, Casper and Arsema have their weekly styling sessions. “We do the big shampoo and condition and she picks a style from my Pinterest board,” Casper says. Arsema settles in with a movie on the laptop, while Casper gets to styling. “The shortest amount of time it takes me is 30-45 minutes with the detangling and the parting, even just for braids or puffs,” she says. “The longest we have ever done is two hours – that one stayed in for two weeks.”

Casper says she loves this special mother-daughter time, especially because she’s always loved doing her own hair. “I like doing hair. And when Arsema came home, I recognized I was in over my head for a little while. But it’s fun for me and I wanted to do this with her,” she says. “It’s like when I’m getting ready in the morning and doing my makeup, she pulls up a chair in the bathroom and does lipstick, too. They are fun moments.”

But for this pair, the hairstyling is about more than just getting primped. “I’ve learned from talking to my friends and doing research into black culture that hair is really important. And so I want to do everything I can to celebrate and enter into the culture that my daughter is a part of,” she says. “I realize that I’m still on the outside looking in and will never fully understand, but I want to do everything I can to keep Arsema connected to that as much as possible. I want her to love everything about herself. I want her to love her hair, her skin, and part of helping her love her hair and have that positive body image is caring for it and making sure it’s healthy and that styling it is a fun and a positive experience.”

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