Tag: high school dropout rates

STUDY: Racial Gap in High School Dropout and Completion Rates Is Close to Non-Existent

via jbhe.com

A new report from the U.S. Department of Education offers new data on high school dropout and completion rates that state the gap between White and Black students in 2019 is no longer measurably different.

The status completion rate is the percentage of 18-to-24 year-olds who have left high school and who hold a high school credential. From 1977 to 2016, the status completion rate for White 18-to-24 year-olds was consistently higher than the rate for Black 18-to-24 year-olds.

Now, for the first time in 40 years, the status completion rate for Black 18-to-24 year-olds was not measurably different from that of White 18-to-24 year-olds. In 2017, 93.8 percent of young Blacks had completed high school compared to 94.8 percent of Whites.

Between October 2016 and October 2017, the number of 15-to 24-year-olds who left school without obtaining a high school credential was approximately 523,000. This so-called event dropout rate was 5.5 percent for Black students and 3.9 percent for White students.

The status dropout rate is the percentage of 16-to 24-year-olds who are not enrolled in school and have not earned a high school credential. In 2017, the status dropout rate for all 16- to 24-year-olds was 5.4 percent. For Blacks the status dropout rate was 6.5 percent, compared to a rate of 4.3 for White students.

The full report, Trends in High School Dropout and Completion Rates in the United States: 2019, may be downloaded by clicking here.

Report: Black and Latino High School Dropout Rates Hit Record Low

new orleans graduates

wmr6cszqfjenlvhk7egajl45y0cqrfq6eo9zxedb7ry0ca5ep7dr7qlasq4fhschHere’s some good news you probably won’t read a lot about: Black and Latino students have cut their dropout rates by more than half over the past ten years. Black students have nearly closed the gap with white students with just 8% leaving high school last year.

According to a new Pew Research Center report, these declines have driven the lowest U.S. dropout rate ever recorded, with just 7% of 18- to 24-year-olds leaving school in the last year. Read more from Pew.

This good news raises a lot of interesting questions, namely, why is it so underreported and why does the media put so much attention on the failings of Black youth instead of investigating what interventions have driven the increase in high school graduation.

article by Donovan X. Ramsey via newsone.com