Gospel Legend Shirley Caesar’s Viral #UNameItChallenge Leads to New Fame, More Charity

Shirley Caesar (photo via defendernetwork.com)

Shirley Caesar (photo via defendernetwork.com)

article by Bil Carpenter via blackenterprise.com

A couple of weeks ago, a friend of DJ Suede, also known as “the Remix God,” sent him a video clip of traditional gospel music legend Pastor Shirley Caesar’s 2007 remake of her 1988 classic “Hold My Mule.” Suede, an Atlanta-based mixer with an Instagram following of almost 100K,  has said that he’ll remix anything. Since his mom was also a big fan of the 11 time Grammy Award-winning artist, he just remixed the song for fun, posting it online with the tag, “Grandma, what are you cooking for Thanksgiving?”

That intoxicating hip-hop music mashup has now become the viral success story of the season. It was even referenced during this year’s American Music Awards telecast, and pushed “Hold My Mule,” a song recorded long before Billboard started compiling gospel song charts, into the No. 1 spot on this week’s Gospel Streaming Songs chart, thanks to over 800,000 streams within the last week. It’s the song’s first time on any national chart.

In the original song, Caesar tells the story of an 86-year-old man named Shouting John, who joined a church that didn’t believe in dancing and speaking in tongues. John was kicked put out of the church for shouting too loudly during the sermon.

He countered his ouster with a testimony that God had blessed him as a farmer.”Look!” he shouted. “I got beans, greens, potatoes, tomatoes, lambs, rams, hogs, dogs, chickens, turkeys, rabbits … you name it!” (See the 5:45 mark in the YouTube video above.) That line became the foundation for Suede’s “You Name It! ” remix.

“It was just a song,” Suede told Big Tigger, on Atlanta’s V103 radio station. Then, on November 13, R&B star Chris Brown reposted the song with his signature choreography with the hastag #UNameItChallenge on his Instagram page. It has since racked up over 2.3 million views on Brown’s page, motivating thousands of people to share it and to answer the challenge with their own video dance responses.

Initially, some observers wondered if the 78-year-old Caesar, who was a hardliner in her younger days about the separation of gospel and mainstream music, would object to the viral video. However, she’s in nearly full support of this new incarnation of it. Continue reading

Gospel & Preachers Hall to be Added to R&B Music Hall of Fame Museum

Aretha

The Robinson Global Sports & Entertainment Group announced its plans to build the Gospel Music and Preachers Hall of Fame Museum (Gospel Hall) as an addition to the existing R&B Music Hall of Fame Museum (R&B Hall) project.

“What makes this Gospel Hall unique is that we also honor the preachers alongside with the gospel music to celebrate their significant influence in the history of the black church. We envision the combination of these museums to be one of the top musical entertainment attraction in the country, bringing visitors from everywhere.” says LaMont “ShowBoat” Robinson, Developer and Founder of the project.

Beginning September 2013, the Gospel Hall will hold an induction ceremony annually to honor preachers and music legends who have contributed significantly to the history of gospel music such as the founder of the Church of God In Christ Bishop Charles Harrison Mason in Memphis, TN and Reverend T.D. Jakes of the Potter’s House in Dallas TX, Father of Black gospel music Thomas A. Dorsey and the gospel music icon Kirk Franklin.

The public is invited to visit www.gospelmusicpreachershofm.com to vote for their favorite pastor and gospel singer starting January 3, 2013 and for more information about the Gospel Hall. Groundbreaking is scheduled to take place in the summer of 2013 in Cleveland, Ohio.

Read more at http://www.eurweb.com/2012/11/gospel-preachers-hall-to-be-added-to-rb-music-hall/#wsLE6ytQ7KzJ3Oix.99

Born On This Day in 1911: Gospel Powerhouse Mahalia Jackson

“You going to be famous in this world and walk with kings and queens,” an aunt told  twelve year-old Mahalia Jackson. Born on October 26, 1911, in New Orleans, where she shared a shotgun house with thirteen people, the future could only get better. 

But before it did, Jackson’s mother died when she was just four and she had to leave school in the fourth grade to help out at home. She had music though — the jazz bands that entertained the city and the gospel that healed souls, with some Bessie Smith in between. On Every Wednesday, Friday and four times on Sunday, when Jackson sang at Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, the sound wafted out into the street so that, one imagines, sinners also could enjoy her energetic contralto voice. Continue reading