Tag: Dan Evans

‘Black Panther,’ ‘Black Lightning,’ ‘Luke Cage’ Highlight Rise of Black Superheroes

Image via variety.com

by Daniel Holloway via variety.com

Diversity is on the uptick in comics-inspired TV and film. When “Luke Cage” exec producer Cheo Hodari Coker declared at his show’s San Diego Comic-Con panel last year, “The world is ready for a bulletproof black man,” the crowd erupted in cheers. So did the internet. “Right before I said it, I knew what I was feeling,” Coker later told Variety. “I had said variations of it during the day. It was coming from an emotional place, but I didn’t think it was going to reverberate the way that it did. But I’m glad that it did.”

The “Luke Cage” panel came in July on the heels of widespread protests sparked by the killings of unarmed black men by white police officers in Louisiana and Minnesota. When the show premiered in September, it became the first live-action series about a black superhero since 1994’s “MANTIS.” Now it’s getting some company. Next season the CW will premiere “Black Lightning,” based on the DC Comics superhero. And next year Marvel will debut “Black Panther,” the studio’s first feature with a black hero in the lead.

Social, political and business trends have converged to put black superheroes at the centers of burgeoning television and film franchises after years of being relegated to supporting status. Dan Evans, VP of creative affairs at DC Entertainment, cites the emergence of black superheroes on-screen as part of a larger trend in television and film. “There’s so many examples now, from ‘24’ to ‘The Fast and the Furious’ to ‘Creed,’” says Evans, whose office door features an oversize image of Cyborg, the black teen hero who will play a key role in the upcoming “Justice League” movie. “We’ve seen again and again that if you tell a good story with these characters, people will come.”

In superhero comics, the first appeals to underserved minority audiences came with the debuts of Black Panther (1966), Luke Cage (1972), Black Lightning (1977) and others. “These black superheroes emerge parallel to the changes in American race relations in the late 1960s with the emergence of the Black Power movement,” says Adilifu Nama, author of “Super Black: American Pop Culture and Black Superheroes.” The movement’s push for equality and representation rippled through popular culture. “It wouldn’t be very sensible to think that these demands for diversity would only be in the realm of lunch counters and bus transportation.”

To read full article, go to: ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Luke Cage’ Highlight Rise of Black Superheroes | Variety

DC Entertainment Promotes Animation Vet Dan Evans to VP Creative Affairs

Dan Evans Headshot
DC Entertainment VP Dan Evans (photo via deadline.com)

article by Dominic Patten via Deadline.com

Just over a year after joining from Marvel Studios, Dan Evans has a new job and enlarged portfolio with DC Entertainment. After overseeing the Warner Bros.-owned comic giant’s TV slate of Arrow, GothamSupergirlLucifer and more as Creative Director, Evans has been promoted to VP, Creative Affairs. He will report directly to Geoff Johns, DC’s Chief Creative Officer.

“I’ve known Dan for years. His passion for DC and his creative strengths and experience make him a stellar leader within my Creative Affairs Department,” said Johns Thursday in a statement. “It’s great to have him assume this new role to help me manage the tremendous DC slate across the Studio.”

In his new gig, the ex-Nickelodeon Animation exec will now handle and review creative content for all DC media that are in production with WB, including TV, film, animation and games. Evan’s focus is to ensure that the use of the DC characters and their stories stay true to the core values of the franchises, the company says.

A manager of acquisitions at the WB TV Network back in the late 1990s, Evans worked at Fox Kids TV and was a Governor, Children’s programming for the TV Academy from 2010 to late 2014.