Tag: Carnegie Hall

R.I.P. Grammy Award-Winning Legend David Bowie, Global Icon and Innovator in Music, Art and Fashion

David Bowie with Supermodel wife Iman (photo via popsugar.com)
David Bowie with Supermodel wife Iman (photo via popsugar.com)

As Stevie Wonder so aptly put it in his 1976 tribute to the 20th-century pioneers of sound, “Sir Duke”: “Music is a world within itself / With a language we all understand / With an equal opportunity / For all to sing, dance and clap their hands.”

Sir David Robert Jones, aka “Ziggy Stardust”, aka “The Thin White Duke”, but most commonly known around the world as David Bowie, fully understood and embodied the language of this universality, and connected with audiences around the world, no matter what genre he chose to explore. Some of his greatest commercial success came from his exploration of R&B music (“Young Americans”, “Fame”, “Golden Years”,  “Under Pressure,” “Let’s Dance”), but his musical life was one of constant change and innovation, which made this unique singer, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, record producer, arranger, painter and actor a prominent, global figure in popular music for over four decades.

According to the New York Times, Bowie’s last album, “Blackstar,” a collaboration with a jazz quartet that was typically enigmatic and exploratory, was released on Friday — his birthday.  He had also collaborated on an Off Broadway musical, “Lazarus,” which was a surreal sequel to the 1976 film that featured his definitive screen role, “The Man Who Fell to Earth.”

Bowie wrote songs, above all, about being an outsider: an alien, a misfit, a sexual adventurer, a faraway astronaut. His music was always a mutable blend — rock, cabaret, jazz and what he called “plastic soul” — but it was suffused with genuine soul.  Bowie, in turn, influenced many of today’s prominent R&B, soul, pop/rock and hip-hop artists, (remember Queen Latifah’s collab on the “Fame ’90” redux?) many of whom are already honoring him:

https://twitter.com/kanyewest/status/686449257767776256?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Bowie is to be honored with a concert at Carnegie Hall on March 31 featuring the Roots, Cyndi Lauper and the Mountain Goats.

Bowie lost his 18-month battle with cancer on Sunday night, and is survived by his son, director Duncan Jones, wife Iman and their daughter Alexandria.

To read more about Bowie, his life and career, click here.  To see him perform live in 1974 on “The Dick Cavett Show” with Luther Vandross on background vocals, check out the video below:

article by Lori Lakin Hutcherson (follow @lakinhutcherson)

 

D’Angelo, Ed Sheeran to Lead Bill Withers Tribute at Carnegie Hall on October 1st

Ed Sheeran and D'Angelo
D’Angelo, Ed Sheeran and Sheryl Crow top the initial lineup for “Lean on Him,” an upcoming tribute concert to Bill Withers at Carnegie Hall (Photos: Dave J Hogan/Getty; Paras Griffin/Getty)

D’Angelo, Ed Sheeran, Ledisi and Aloe Blacc are among the artists who will help welcome Bill Withers back to Carnegie Hall on October 1st and pay tribute to the soul musician, who was recently inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The initial lineup for the show, aptly dubbed “Lean on Him,” boasts Sheryl Crow, Amos Lee, Michael McDonald, Dr. John, Keb’ Mo’, Gregory Porter and Kathy Mattea. More artists will be announced in the coming weeks.

Withers will make a rare public appearance at the show, which will find the cast of musicians recreating some of his best known hits and his classic 1973 LP, Live at Carnegie Hall, in its entirety. Greg Phillinganes — who has worked with Stevie Wonder and Michael Jackson — will helm the show as house band leader and musical director.

General admission tickets for “Lean on Him” are currently available through the Carnegie Hall website, while VIP tickets can be purchased via MusicOf.org. While a run-of-the-mill VIP ticket runs $300, a backstage pass is available for $2,000, and a five-course wine-paired dinner with Withers, his wife Marcia and no more than 40 other ticket buyers costs $10,000.

All net profits from the concert will benefit the Stuttering Association for the Young, an organization close to Withers, who has stuttered since childhood.

“Lean on Him” is the brainchild of City Winery and Knitting Factory founder Michael Dorf, who, over the past several years, has produced a slew of notable charity tribute concerts at Carnegie Hall. Earlier this year, the Roots, ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons, Rufus Wainwright and more paid tribute to David Byrne and the Talking Heads; previous concerts have honored Prince, Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Bruce Springsteen, Elton John, Neil YoungR.E.M., the Who, the Rolling Stones and Paul Simon.

Read more: http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/dangelo-ed-sheeran-to-lead-bill-withers-tribute-at-carnegie-hall-20150803#ixzz3hnoveD00 

Library of Congress Acquires Papers of Legendary Jazz Drummer Max Roach

From Max Roach’s archive: a contract for a 1956 club date; an undated photo of Roach, at right, with Art Blakey, center; a 1964 letter from Maya Angelou. Lexey Swall for The New York Times

WASHINGTON — Max Roach, the great drummer and bandleader and paradigm-shifter of jazz, though he disliked that word, never finished an autobiography.  That’s a shame. He died in 2007 at 83, and his career spans the beginning of bebop, the intersection of jazz with the civil rights movement, free improvisation, and jazz’s current state of cross-disciplinary experiments and multimedia performances. Inasmuch as jazz is about change and resistance, he embodied those qualities: He fought anything that would contain or reduce him as an artist and a human being. He would have been well served by his own narrative, set in one voice.

Max RoachBut Roach was archivally minded, and, when he died, he left 400 linear feet of his life and actions to be read: scores and lead sheets, photographs, contracts, itineraries, correspondence, reel tapes and cassettes and drafts of an unfinished autobiography, written with the help of Amiri Baraka. On Monday, the Library of Congress will announce that it has acquired the archive from Mr. Roach’s family and that it will be made available to researchers.

“What I think he would hope people would see,” said the violist Maxine Roach, his daughter from his first marriage, “is that there was a lot about his life that was difficult, you know? The struggles. A lot about economics, and jazz as a word that we didn’t define ourselves.” (Roach felt that it was a pejorative term; he preferred to call it African-American music.)  “But aside from all of that,” she continued, “I hope that people see his excellence and his mastery of his skill, which helped him rise in this country that’s been so hard on black men especially, and how he went through it and what price he paid.”

Continue reading “Library of Congress Acquires Papers of Legendary Jazz Drummer Max Roach”

Prince to be Honored at Tribute Concert in Carnegie Hall

Prince
The music of Prince will be honored at a special concert at Carnegie Hall in March and The Rootsand Talib Kweli will be among those that pay tribute.

The show, the latest in an annual concert series put on by New York entrepreneur Michael Dorf, will raise money for various music education organizations, including Music Unites, the Pinwheel Project and the Center for Arts Education. Past shows have paid tribute to The Rolling StonesThe WhoJoni Mitchell and Elton John among other luminaries.

In addition to Talib Kweli and The Roots, performers at the show who will interpret Prince songs will include the Blind Boys of AlabamaDeVotchKaLiving ColourMadeleine Peyroux and more. Tickets for the concert, to take place March 7, are available online here.

article by Reggie Ugwu via bet.com

Jay-Z Comes Home to Repay a Debt to Brooklyn, Performs At Newly-Opened Barclays Center

 

Richard Perry/The New York Times

For many years, Jay-Z closed out his concerts with “Encore,” a soothing, triumphant number from “The Black Album,” which at the time of its release in 2003 was billed as something of a retirement. “From Marcy to Madison Square,” he rapped, sketching an arc that had taken him from a Brooklyn housing project to headlining the most symbolically important arena in the country.

That used to be enough, goal-wise, but no musician has reframed the potential for bucket-list completion and brand extension like Jay-Z, who in the past decade has consistently sought new ceilings to break through. That journey brought him to the Barclays Center in Brooklyn on Friday night, for the first show of a sold-out eight-night run in this new rusty bunker that will house the Brooklyn Nets, a team that he owns a small piece of, and for which he is the unofficial ambassador. Continue reading “Jay-Z Comes Home to Repay a Debt to Brooklyn, Performs At Newly-Opened Barclays Center”