Tag: African-American Education

For the 5th Year in a Row, Chicago’s Urban Prep Academy Students Achieve 100 Percent College Acceptance

urban-prep-chicago-660

For the fifth year in a row, Chicago’s Urban Prep Academy has again achieved a 100 percent acceptance rate for its 2014 class.  This year, 240 students were accepted into four-year colleges and universities.  “I got into a lot of different schools but right now I’m thinking about four different choices,” student Keshawn Cathery said.

“I got into Georgetown University which I will be attending in the fall,” student Derrick Little said.

As part of an Urban Prep ritual, when seniors are admitted into college, they exchange their red uniform ties for a red and gold striped tie, a symbol of how hard they’ve worked.  “The tie represents to me moving on from a boy to becoming a young man and actually doing something with my life,” graduating senior Dumar Harris said.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel gave the students a pep talk Tuesday, and NBA star Dwyane Wade donated $10,000 through his foundation to offset the cost of the student prom.

Related Posts:

But while students, staff and parents are celebrating the Class of 2014’s achievements, critics say the students in danger of not graduating never even make it to senior year.

“Urban Prep is not for everyone, and those students may leave us,” school founder and CEO Tim King, said. “But the fact that some students choose to leave us should not be used as a weapon against the students who have chosen to stay and have achieved this incredible accomplishment.”

Just ask Urban Prep alumni. The 2010 class the first to graduate from the school in 2010, and now they’re about to graduate from college.  “Being the first graduating class you see a lot of progression, you see a lot of downfall, but everything comes just together. If you keep striving for that one goal, no one can tell you no,” Urban Prep alumnus Paris Williams said.

To see video of this continually wonderful story, click here.

article by LeeAnn Trotter via nbcchicago.com

 

Wal-Mart Donates $1.75 Million to Boost African-American Achievement

470738483-wal-mart-truck-sits-outside-of-a-wal-mart-store-on
A Wal-Mart truck sits outside a Wal-Mart store on Feb. 20, 2014, in San Lorenzo, Calif. (JUSTIN SULLIVAN/GETTY IMAGES)

According to a press release, a $500,000 grant from Wal-Mart will go to the United Negro College Fund to help sixteen HBCUs gain financial stability to ensure their continued mission of providing black students with higher education. Grants of $1 million and $250,000 to the National Urban League and the NAACP respectively will help individuals secure and build successful careers through training and placement assistance and help businesses create more job opportunities. Wal-Mart is providing $1.75 million in grants through its foundation to three of the nation’s biggest civil rights organizations: the NAACP, National Urban League and United Negro College Fund.

“With today’s economic climate there is a growing need to empower individuals in communities nationwide with access to opportunities that will help them live better. Part of this work will come from helping businesses understand and unlock the powerful results that a more diverse workforce has to offer,” said Wal-Mart Senior Director of Corporate Affairs Tony Waller in the release. “By helping one individual at a time build a successful career, we are growing a more competitive work environment. A competitive environment ignites innovation, which helps build stronger communities and, ultimately, a stronger America.”

“Since 2006 we have been able to increasingly grow our workforce training program through ongoing support from the Walmart Foundation and subsequently have exceeded expectations of the number of individuals we’ve been able to serve,” Marc H. Morial, president and CEO of the NUL, said in the press release. “This new grant will help us further strengthen our workforce development programs and continue helping African Americans and other communities of color across the United States secure economic independence and empowerment.”

article by Breanna Edwards via theroot.com

 

Education Department, Alabama District To Promote Advanced Placement Classes To Black Students

Lee County Schools Al

This week, the U.S. Department of Education Office for Civil Rights (OCR)  made a announcement that it has reached an agreement with the state of Alabama that will aid all students, particularly African-American ones, in accessing advanced placement classes. The Lee County School District entered in to the historic first-time agreement, which aims to bolster higher-level learning and increase college opportunities for students.

The plan has a few key points that Lee District intends to roll out immediately, including addressing the dearth of Black students in advanced or AP classes and higher-level courses, finding out why Black students are faced with barriers, introducing dual-enrollment courses with the local community college at the predominantly Black high school, and offering transportation between buildings.

Lastly, material will be produced to encourage students of all levels and backgrounds to embrace AP courses, pursue higher-level courses, and consider going to college. The OCR will be deeply involved in helping Lee County get the program rolling.

From the OCR’s assistant secretary Catherine E. Lhamon:

We look forward to working with the Lee County School District administrators to ensure that all students have equal access to a quality education and are pleased that the district has taken positive steps to increase college-ready access through raising the enrollment of Black students in AP and other higher level courses. The Lee County School District has been a partner throughout this process and I applaud the steps the District is taking to help ensure their compliance with our civil rights laws to serve all students.

To learn more about the Lee County School District plans, click here.

article by D. L. Chandler via newsone.com

Education Policy Advisor David J. Johns Named New Director of White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans

David J. JohnsDavid J. Johns has been appointed as the executive director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans. As executive director Johns will be asked to identify evidence-based best practices to improve African American student achievement from cradle to career. The goal of the initiative is to work with federal, state, and local agencies as well as community groups to produce a more effective continuum of education programs for African-American students.

Johns has been serving as a senior education policy advisor to the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. He is a former elementary school teacher in New York City.

Johns is a graduate of Columbia University where he triple majored in English, creative writing, and African-American studies. He earned a master’s degree in sociology and education policy at Teachers College of Columbia University.

article via The New Director of the White House Initiative on Educational Excellence for African Americans : The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education.