Tag: African-American actresses on TV

History! Viola Davis Becomes 1st Black Woman To Win Emmy For Lead Actress in Drama; Regina King and Uzo Aduba win Emmys for Supporting Roles

67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

Viola Davis made history Sunday night as the first Black woman to win an Emmy for outstanding actress in a drama series, bringing a sisterhood of Black actresses to their feet at the announcement of her accomplishment.

But Davis’ win was the second history-making moment of her night — as Vanity Fair points out, the nomination of lead actress, alongside Taraji P. Henson’s nomination, was the first time multiple women of color have been considered for the award at the same time.

The significance of the moment was not lost on Henson, who stood to embrace Davis as she made her way to the stage.  In a powerful speech that amplified the voices of Black women who have called for more representation in TV, media and film, Davis noted that roles for Black women are scarce in a whitewashed Hollywood.

“The only thing that separates women of color from anyone else is opportunity. You cannot win an Emmy for roles that are simply not there,” she said.

A quote from Harriet Tubman, which she recited at the top of her acceptance speech, served as a succinct but profound outline of what many Black actresses are facing in the world of film, even in 2015.

“In my mind I see a line and over that line I see green fields and lovely flowers and beautiful white women with their arms stretched out to me over that line, but I can’t seem to get there no how. I can’t seem to get over that line.”

You can watch her speech here:

But Davis’ win was not the first exceptional moment for Black women at the 2015 Emmy Awards. Orange Is The New Black star Uzo Aduba also made her own history when she accepted the Emmy for Best Actress in a Drama Series, making her the first actress to win both a drama and a comedy award for the same role.

67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

Hollywood veteran and favorite Regina King also took home an award for Best Supporting Actress in a Limited Series or a Movie for “American Crime.” It was King’s first nomination and win.

67th Annual Primetime Emmy Awards - Show

For a full list of winners, click below:

2015 Emmy Awards: A List Of The Night’s Big Winners

article by Christina Coleman via newsone.com

Joy Bryant to Co-Star in ABC Pilot “The Advocate”

Joy Bryant
(PHOTO CREDIT: ANDREW WALKER)

Joy Bryant is the co-lead of new ABC pilot The Advocate.

According to Deadline, the Parenthood actress will star alongside Coby Bell of The Game and Kim Raver.

The Advocate is inspired by the true story of former talent agent, Byrdie Lifson-Pompan, who teamed up with medical doctor and health education specialist, Valerie Ulene to launch a healthcare consulting company.

Bryant will play Dr. Ryan Clarke, a brilliant doctor who partners with Raver’s character Francis “Frankie” Reese to open a patient advocacy firm.

RELATED: Networks Casting More Actors of Color This Pilot Season

Coby Bell will take on the role of Chris, who is trying to keep the medical firm afloat.

The drama was written by Sheldon Turner, directed by Michael M. Robin and will be executive produced by Turner and Jennifer Klein. Byrdie Lifson-Pompan and Valerie Ulene will serve as consulting producers.

article by Dominique Hobdy via essence.com

The Kerry Washington Revolution: African-American Female Leads on TV

Spencer, who has had a recurring role on CBS’ “Mom” this season and was rumored at one point to star in a remake of “Murder, She Wrote,” gets her own show in “Red Band Society,” a Fox medical drama that involves many supporting teenage characters who live at the hospital where Spencer is a doctor.  Similarly, ABC recently ordered a new Shonda Rhimes series, “How to Get Away With Murder” starring Viola Davis as a law professor who gets wrapped up in a murder mystery with four students.

Taraji P. Henson, who was killed off CBS’ “Person of Interest” this season, dusted herself off and will report for duty on “Empire,” a new, soap-style series about the world of hip-hop music from Lee Daniels and Danny Strong, who collaborated on the smash film “The Butler.” Henson plays Cookie Lyon, the former business partner and ex-wife of Lucious Lyon (Terrence Howard), a music mogul trying to stay relevant.

Veteran actress Alfre Woodard has played everything from a freed slave in “12 Years a Slave” to a desperate housewife. She’s on the upswing, career-wise. Woodard is going to play the president to Katherine Heigl’s crusading CIA agent in the NBC drama “State of Affairs.”

Finally, Rashida Jones has been cast as “Angie Tribeca,” a TBS satire on police procedurals that was created by Jones’ “Office” co-star Steve Carell and his wife, Nancy.

article by Robert Rorke via nypost.com